Ask Me Anything 16 October 2020

By | anatomy, biomechanics, Biopsychosocial care, Business, Injury prevention, Motor learning, Pilates teaching, Rehabilitation & Pain science

Topics in this video

  • 02:55 PRP injections for elbow pain
  • 10:43 Mind / Muscle connection
  • 24:24 Cueing breath
  • 29:39 Do Pilates instructors charge GST?

  • 31:46 How to strengthen a bruised knee
  • 35:35 Cerebellum ectopia
  • 40:39 Spinocerebellar ataxia
  • 45:40 How long should you raise your heart rate every day?

AMA 10 October 2020

By | anatomy, biomechanics, Biopsychosocial care, Injury prevention, Pilates teaching, Rehabilitation & Pain science

Topics in this video

  • 00:22 Hiatus hernia
  • 09:12 Is muscle compensation real?

  • 27:26 Are Breathe Education courses recognised internationally
  • 30:36 What causes lateral pelvic tilt?
  • 39:20 Can you train yourself to flex your hip like a gymnast?

  • 44:12 How soon can you flex your spine after microdiscectomy?
  • 52:14 Knee pain when running – my knees roll in!

Send your questions to ama@breathe.edu.au

Wrists need to get stronger too

By | biomechanics, Biopsychosocial care, Pilates industry, Pilates teaching

I had a wonderful question in my Saturday matwork masterclass for Breathe Education where we opened up a discussion about feeling discomfort in wrists. I’m sure that we’ve all been there. You’re about 5 planks into a sequence and all you want to do is drop down to your forearms. Often at times we see our clients sit back after a long stretch series and gingerly roll their wrists. Maybe, if you’re lucky, you’ll get an eye roll too.

Let’s begin the process of reframing the way we look at value of discomfort in different parts of our body.

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Does an assessment actually add any value for clients with low back pain?

By | anatomy, biomechanics, Biopsychosocial care, Pilates teaching, Rehabilitation & Pain science

Mitchell Gibbs is a PhD candidate at Western Sydney University where he researches chronic pain, pain science, and exercise. Mitch also has a Master of Research in chronic pain and exercise, and a bachelor of Sport and Exercise Science.

Mitchell’s 2018 paper Buy In For Back Pain – Does Individualization Matter?  had some very surprising findings in relation to the benefits of doing a thorough physical assessment on clients with low back pain. The paper was published in the Journal of Clinical Exercise Physiology.

In this conversation Mitch talks through the research process, and discusses what he thinks the findings mean for clinicians.

You can find Mitch on Instagram @mitchgibbs.aes @rethink.mvmnt

Pregnancy, continence and how to do a proper pelvic floor contraction with Sarah Haag

By | Biopsychosocial care, Pilates teaching, Pregnancy, Urinary incontinence | No Comments

 

Sarah is a women’s health physiotherapist, and co-owner of Entropy Physiotherapy and Wellness in Chicago, Illinois. Sarah graduated from Marquette University in 2002 with a Master’s of Physical Therapy. She went on to get a Masters of Science in Women’s Health and a Doctorate of Physical Therapy from Rosalind Franklin University in 2008.

In 2009 Sarah was awarded the Certificate of Achievement in Pelvic Physical Therapy (CAPP) from the Section on Women’s Health, and Board Certification as a specialist in women’s health (WCS).

Sarah and I talk about pregnancy and exercise, what you should and shouldn’t do with a pregnant client, pregnancy-related pelvic girdle pain, and what you as a group exercise instructor can do for your clients with pelvic girdle pain. We talk about diastasis recti abdominis or abdominal separation, and finally we spend quite a bit of time on Sarah’s favourite topic, urinary incontinence, on which she has recently published a book.

Towards the end of the interview Sarah gives in-depth instructions on how to do a pelvic floor contraction, and how to cue one. And, when to cue pelvic floor and when not to mention it!

You can follow Sarah on Facebook and Twitter @SarahHaagPT.

You can purchase the Elvie Kegel Trainer here

The Female Athlete with Antony Lo

By | biomechanics, Biopsychosocial care, Injury prevention, Rehabilitation & Pain science | No Comments

 

Antony Lo is a Sydney based physiotherapist who specialises in female athletes, and in particular female Crossfit athletes.

Having successfully grown 2 private practices, Antony sold these to concentrate on his Specialisation Training Program and developing educational courses for health professionals and the general public. He still consults at 2 locations in Sydney seeing everyone from children to the elderly, as well as his sports-specific patients. He also travels around Australia to deliver seminar information for his course The Female Athlete, and to provide consultations for those interested in his approach.

I have been friends with Antony since 2006 when we worked together. Every time I talk with Antony I learn something valuable, he is one of the practitioners I admire the most, and who I have learned the most from.

In this conversation we talk about pelvic health, urinary incontinence, low back pain, making quick changes and Antony’s approach to evidence-based practice.

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Pelvic Instability – Not A Thing

By | biomechanics, Biopsychosocial care, Injury prevention, Pilates industry, Pilates teaching, Rehabilitation & Pain science

Read the Research:

Relaxin levels during pregnancy are not related to pelvic pain

  1. Pregnancy-related pelvic girdle pain and its relationship with relaxin levels during pregnancy: a systematic review (Aldabe et al., 2012)
  2. Association between the serum levels of relaxin and responses to the active straight leg raise test in pregnancy (Vøllestad et al., 2012)

The sacroiliac joint basically doesn’t move – even in people with diagnosed “pelvic instability”

  1. Movement of the sacroiliac joint during the Active Straight Leg Raise test in patients with long-lasting severe sacroiliac joint pain (Kibsgård et al., 2017)
  2. A radiostereometric analysis of movements of the sacroiliac joints during the standing hip flexion test (Sturesson et al., 2000)

Pregnancy is characterised by widespread tissue hypersensitivity

  1. Pregnancy is characterized by widespread deep-tissue hypersensitivity independent of lumbopelvic pain intensity, a facilitated response to manual orthopedic tests, and poorer self-reported health (Palsson et al., 2015)

You can’t palpate movement of the pelvic joints (even if you think you can)

  1. Manual palpation of lumbo-pelvic landmarks: a validity study (Kilby et al., 2012)
  2. Inter-examiner reliability of four static palpation tests used for assessing pelvic dysfunction (Holmgren et al, 2008)
  3. Clinical tests of the sacroiliac joint: a systematic methodological review. Part 1: reliability (van der Wurff et al., 2000)(a)
  4. Clinical tests of the sacroiliac joint: a systematic methodological review. Part 2: validity (van der Wurff et al., 2000)(b)

The biggest predictor of recovery from pelvic pain is – belief that you will recover

  1. Prognostic factors for recovery from postpartum pelvic girdle pain (Vøllestad et al., 2009)

A person-centred approach to pain with Kjartan Vibe Fersum

By | Biopsychosocial care, Rehabilitation & Pain science

Kjartan Vibe Fersum is a postdoctoral researcher at the University of Bergen, Norway, and was the lead author on the original CFT paper in 2012, with co-authors Peter O’Sullivan, Skouen,  Smith, & Kvåle.

In addition to his teaching and research at the University of Bergen, he works in clinical practice as a Specialist Musculoskeletal Physiotherapist in Bergen, and a contributor to the Pain-Ed project, where his mission is to inform both the public and health care practitioners about the latest pain research, and to dispel common myths about pain and provide hope for change.

Kjartan is incredibly well-read, but his true genius seems to lie in combining his rich and nuanced understanding of the research with a flexible, person-centred worldview.

This interview has too many gems and insights to list – you must listen to it if you work with people in pain.

Resources

  • Synnott et al., (2015) Physiotherapists may stigmatise or feel unprepared to treat people with low back pain and psychosocial factors that influence recovery: a systematic review
  • Kamper et al., (2017) What Do Patients with Chronic Spinal Pain Expect from Their Physiotherapist?
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